Old Village Fire Company
Station 11
Middletown Township Fire Department

1340 Highway 35
Middletown, NJ 07748
P: 732.671.5704 / F: 732.796.0127
info@oldvillagefc.org

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General Information
Fires in residences have taken a high toll of life and property. In 2005 there were:

  • 396,000 residential fires

  • 3,055 civilian fire deaths

  • 13,825 civilian fire injuries

  • $6.9 billion in property damage

In the event of a fire, remember time is the biggest enemy and every second counts!

Escape first, then call for help. Develop a home fire escape plan and designate a meeting place outside. Make sure everyone in the family knows two ways to escape from every room. Practice feeling your way out with your eyes closed. Never stand up in a fire, always crawl low under the smoke and try to keep your mouth covered. Never return to a burning building for any reason; it may cost you your life.

Finally, having a working smoke alarm dramatically increases your chances of surviving a fire. And remember to practice a home escape plan frequently with your family.

This information was provided by the United States Fire Administration.

Smoke DetectorsInstall. Inspect. Protect. Smoke Alarms Save Lives
The Install. Inspect. Protect. Campaign is part of the U.S. Fire Administrationís effort to reduce fire deaths and injuries across the nation by urging residents to install smoke alarms in their homes and inspect and maintain them on a regular basis. Working smoke alarms and sprinklers save lives.

A working smoke alarm can help you and your family escape a deadly home fire. It can also help save the lives of firefighters who would otherwise have to risk their lives by searching a burning home for residents. A working smoke alarm continuously scans the air for smoke, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It never sleeps.

The USFA is encouraging you to practice fire safety and do your part to get out, before firefighters have to come in.
 

Smoking & Home FiresSmoking & Home Fires
About 1,000 people are killed every year from smoking material home fires. People close to where a smoking material fire starts are harder to save, because the fire spreads fast. Most fires caused by smoking materials start on beds, furniture, or in trash. Fires caused by cigarettes and other smoking materials are preventable.

Of the fatal victims who were not the smokers:

  • Thirty-four percent were children of the smokers.

  • Twenty-five percent were neighbors or friends
    of the smokers.

  • One in four people killed in home fires is not the smoker whose cigarettes caused the fire.

If you smoke, put it out. All the way. Every time.

Residential Fire Sprinklers
It is the official position of the U.S. Fire Administration that all Americans should be protected against death, injury, and property loss resulting from fire in their residences. All homes should be equipped with smoke alarms and automatic fire sprinklers, and families should prepare and practice emergency escape plans.

Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, toxic gas that has the molecular formula CO. The molecule consists of a carbon atom that is triply bonded to an oxygen atom.

Carbon Monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of the fossil fuels - gas, oil, coal and wood used in boilers, engines, oil burners, gas fires, water heaters, solid fuel appliances and open fires.

For more information on Carbon Monoxide and Indoor Air Quality visit the Environmental Protection Agency website by clicking here.

Escape Planning
Get Out Safely
More than 3,500 Americans die each year in fires, and approximately 18,300 are injured. Deaths resulting from failed emergency escapes are particularly avoidable.

The United States Fire Administration (USFA) believes that having a sound escape plan will greatly reduce fire deaths and protect you and your family's safety if a fire occurs.

Have a Sound Fire Escape Plan
In the event of a fire, remember - time is the biggest enemy and every second counts! Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly. In less than 30 seconds a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for a house to fill with thick black smoke and become engulfed in flames.

Practice Escaping From Every Room In The Home
Practice escape plans every month. The best plans have two ways to get out of each room. If the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke, you will need a second way out. A secondary route might be a window onto an adjacent roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows. Purchase only collapsible ladders evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory such as Underwriters Laboratory (UL). Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly and that security bars can be properly opened. Also, practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.

Security Bars Require Special Precautions
Security bars may help to keep your family safe from intruders, but they can also trap you in a deadly fire! Windows and doors with security bars must have quick release devices to allow them to be opened immediately in an emergency. Make sure everyone in the family understands and practices how to properly operate and open locked or barred doors and windows.
 
Immediately Leave The Home
When a fire occurs, do not waste any time saving property. Take the safest exit route, but if you must escape through smoke, remember to crawl low, under the smoke and keep your mouth covered. The smoke contains toxic gases which can disorient you or, at worst, overcome you.
 
Never Open Doors That Are Hot To The Touch
When you come to a closed door, use the back of your hand to feel the top of the door, the doorknob, and the crack between the door and door frame to make sure that fire is not on the other side. If it feels hot, use your secondary escape route. Even if the door feels cool, open it carefully. Brace your shoulder against the door and open it slowly. If heat and smoke come in, slam the door and make sure it is securely closed, then use your alternate escape route.
 
Designate A Meeting Place Outside and Take Attendance
Designate a meeting location away from the home, but not necessarily across the street. For example, meet under a specific tree or at the end of the driveway or front sidewalk to make sure everyone has gotten out safely and no one will be hurt looking for someone who is already safe. Designate one person to go to a neighbor's home to phone the fire department.
 
Once Out, Stay Out
Remember to escape first, then notify the fire department using the 911 system or proper local emergency number in your area. Never go back into a burning building for any reason. Teach children not to hide from firefighters. If someone is missing, tell the firefighters. They are equipped to perform rescues safely.

Finally, having working smoke alarms installed on every level of your home dramatically increases your chances of survival. Smoke alarm batteries need to be tested every month and changed with new ones at least once a year. Also, consider replacing the entire smoke alarm every ten years, or as the manufacturer guidelines recommend.

Fire Safety For Kids
Visit the USFA Kids page for additional information. Download a Fire Safety coloring book here.

The Old Village Fire Company is an IRS-designated 501(c)3 non-profit organization.
For questions regarding the website, please email webmaster@oldvillagefc.org.
The information displayed on these pages are property of the Old Village Fire Company Inc., Middletown, N.J. 1955-2016